FASTag purchase: What are the documents you need to buy FasTag RFID tag for NHAI toll plazas? Full list here

FASTag purchase: Still haven’t bought your FASTag RFID tag? From December 1, 2019 toll payments at NHAI toll plazas will mandatorily happen through the FASTag cashless system. Those who do not have the FasTag device installed on their vehicles will have to pay double the toll amount. The FASTag system comes with several benefits for its customers such as ease of payment, near non-stop movement of vehicles at toll plazas, and online recharge. FASTag is based on radio-frequency identification (RFID). The tag is affixed on the windscreen of a vehicle and when that vehicle passes through any toll plaza, the toll gets deducted automatically. The validity of a FASTag is five years. It is linked with a prepaid or savings account. After purchasing a FASTag, you need to recharge or top-up based on your requirement. To purchase FASTag, you need to submit a copy of the Registration Certificate (RC) of the vehicle and a passport-size photograph of the vehicle owner. Apart from these documents, you need to submit KYC documents as per the category of the vehicle owner. The KYC documents (ID and address proof) can be one or more from PAN Card/Driving License/Passport/Voter ID/Aadhaar Card (wit...

We recently looked at the origins of the integrated circuit (IC) and the calculator, which was

We recently looked at the origins of the integrated circuit (IC) and the calculator, which was the IC’s first killer app, but a surprise twist is that the calculator played a big part in the invention of the next world-changing marvel, the microprocessor. There is some dispute as to which company invented the microprocessor, and we’ll talk about that further down. But who invented the first commercially available microprocessor? That honor goes to Intel for the 4004. We pick up the tale with Robert Noyce, who had co-invented the IC while at Fairchild Semiconductor. In July 1968 he left Fairchild to co-found Intel for the purpose of manufacturing semiconductor memory chips. While Intel was still a new startup living off of their initial $3 million in financing, and before they had a semiconductor memory product, as many start-ups do to survive they took on custom work. In April 1969, Japanese company Busicom hired them to do LSI (Large-Scale Integration) work for a family of calculators. Busicom’s design, consisting of twelve interlinked chips, was considered a complicated one. For example, it included shift-register memory, a serial type of memory which complicates the control ...