Here at Hackaday we are a diverse bunch, we all bring our own experience to the

Here at Hackaday we are a diverse bunch, we all bring our own experience to the task of bringing you the best of the hardware scene. Our differing backgrounds were recently highlighted by a piece from my colleague [Dan] in which he covered the teardown of a cordless electric chainsaw. It was his line “Now, we’d normally shy away from any electric chainsaw, especially a cordless saw, and doubly so a Harbor Freight special“. that caught my eye. I’m with him on cordless tools which I see as a cynical ploy from manufacturers to ensure 5-yearly replacements, and I agree that cheap tools are a false economy. But electric chainsaws? Here on this small farm, they’re the saw of choice and here’s why. A small British farm is not a forestry business, but it’s fair to say that a chainsaw is a tool that sees fairly regular use. Branches come down, pieces of hedge need taming, and with a hungry woodburner to satisfy, firewood needs to be cut. You won’t be surprised then to find that my dad has had more than one chainsaw over the years, but you may be surprised to find that this long experience has led us to rely on electric saws exclusively for the last couple of decades. So why do we load a ...

Bringing hybrid technology to light trucks isn’t a new or novel idea—a small increase in mpg

Bringing hybrid technology to light trucks isn’t a new or novel idea—a small increase in mpg is a large percentage when fuel economy is in the teens. General Motors previously offered hybrid Chevrolet Silverados and GMC Sierras. Chrysler, way back in the Daimler days, co-developed a longitudinal hybrid transmission that was all but stillborn in the form of the Dodge Durango and Chrysler Aspen hybrids (the same transmission was used in BMW and GM SUVs). UPS even dabbled with the idea of a series hybrid using hydraulics. With the automotive industry (at the moment) still marching toward Obama-era fuel-economy targets, it should come as no surprise that Ram is doing all it can to make its trucks as efficient as possible. But unlike the giant banners on the doors of circa-2008 Chevy Tahoe hybrids, nothing on this truck proclaims that your testosterone-fueled purchase of a Ram 1500 pickup is secretly reducing America’s fuel consumption. Enter eTorque: Any 2019 Ram 1500—the all-new one, not the Ram Classic that is just a continuation of the previous generation—can be equipped with a motor/generator attached to its engine’s crankshaft via a belt that is capable of add...