Hardness, durability and strength are among the top vital mechanical values for industrial steel products, determining the physical integrity of a product when subjected to applied forces. The majority of steel alloys are innately strong with good resistance to mechanical deformation, but products that occasionally or routinely experience scuffing or impacts have to be manufactured from alloys with improved hardness values for better abrasion resistance. Increasing the hardness of a material typically minimizes its vulnerability to friction. However, this can then reduce the toughness of the steel and increase its susceptibility to fracture. High hardness steels are additionally usually less ductile and cannot be as easily formed as alternative industrial steel products. This article will look at the effect of toughness and hardness on the abrasion resistance of various steel products. Industrial steel’s hardness is quantified by the Brinell scale (26 – 600), which measures the resistance of a material to impacting forces. Steel alloys at the upper end of the scale are some of the hardest engineered metals globally, offering better resistance to heavy-wearing at the cost of duct...